Devghat

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Devghat is one of the famous religious and cultural centers in central Nepal. At the time of the 1991 Nepal census it had a population of 5786 people living in 1132 individual households.
The town is located at the junction of the Seti Gandaki and Krishna Gandaki rivers, and is one of the holiest places in Hindu mythology as well as a holy place for Hindu gods. Lying 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) from the city of Narayangarh, 20 kilometres (12 mi) from Sauraha and 150 kilometres (93 mi) southwest of the capital Kathmandu, the area boasts many natural features due to its geography and climate including tropical forests, wild animals and birds.

Religious sites

Devghat is home to various temples and caves dedicated to Hindu gods, goddesses, and saints including Goddess Sita’s cave. In Makar Sankranti, huge melas (gatherings) are observed each year making it one of the largest religious melas in Nepal. The date when this festival started remains unknown. Hindu pilgrims bathe at the junction of the Krishna Gandaki river well known for its rare ‘Saligram Sheela (holy stone), which Hindu devotees worship as Lord Vishnu.

Modern development

Devghat has three high schools, one post-graduate college, three retirement home projects, one ayurvedic health station, part of Bharatpur medical college, the guest house of B P Koirala Memorial Cancer Hospital etc. Volunteers from various health organizations provide free health check up camps on a regular basis. A historic suspension bridge connects the Tanahun and Chitwan districts of the town.
The government of Nepal has established Devghat Area Development Committee for the integrated development of this area while the non-resident Nepalese Association has established a project to construct 200 retirement homes in the Chitwan district of the town.
A proposed Saptagandaki hydropower plant is in the pipeline for construction. It is expected that living standards in the area will improve if the project goes ahead through religious tourism.
Devghat Area Development committee has started constructing Hindu end of life ritual sites, with economic assistance from the Government of Nepal.